Biology

Department of Biology

The Department of Biology offers a B.S. in Biology, a B.S. in Biology of Global Health, a B.S. in Environment Biology, and a B.S. in Neurobiology, as well as a minor in Biology.

MAJOR PROGRAMS

The Department of Biology offers four majors: Biology, Biology of Global Health, Environmental Biology, and Neurobiology.  These majors are designed to educate students in the breadth of subject matter encompassed by the biological sciences, including advances in knowledge at the forefront of this discipline.  Graduates will be well prepared for advanced study in biological sciences, medicine and public health, education, science policy or law, as well as professional careers in business and biotechnology.

The First and Second YearS
Entering the Program, Choosing the Major, and Advising

First-year students enter the program as Biology majors; specific majors within the department are not declared until the fall semester of the second year. Students receive an academic advisor from among the faculty in the Department of Biology who will work with them during their first year. Transfer students should see the Director of Undergraduate Studies to be assigned an advisor. 

During the first year, in addition to courses in the liberal arts, students enroll in Foundations in Biology I and II, the First-Year Seminar in Biology, General Chemistry I and II, Calculus I, and either Probability and Statistics or Calculus II.  We strongly recommend that students enroll in only four courses in their first semester (e.g., Biology+lab, Chemistry+lab, math, and one core requirement). 

During the fall term of the second year all students will submit a "statement of purpose" comprising an essay and a 4-year academic plan that proposes future coursework to fulfill the specific requirements of their chosen major. At this time, students may opt for one of the three specialized majors—Biology of Global Health, Environmental Biology, or Neurobiology—or elect to remain in the Biology major.  Students will be assigned new academic advisors who will meet with the students within the major each semester to ensure that their academic plans are compatible with the goals of the major.

Second-year students who are undeclared or are considering changing majors may also declare in any of the majors offered through the Department during the fall term and are generally not at a significant curricular disadvantage relative to other students. Interested transfer students or third-year students can also apply at the same time as the second-year students, but they must pay close attention to their four- year plan and ascertain that they will be able to complete the coursework for the specialized major.

Learning Goals and Research

The Department of Biology has developed ten learning goals for our majors, outlined below and detailed on the Department web site. The first five learning goals are grouped as ‘Insight into the Process and Product of Science.’ These focus on the process of science, to emphasize our belief that the goal of a biology education is to enable students to make creative use of their knowledge. The second five learning goals are grouped as ‘Fundamental Biological Concepts.’ The learning goals are:

  1. Integrate new knowledge into existing intellectual frameworks.
  2. Engage with scientific inquiry.
  3. Represent and interpret data in quantitative and statistically meaningful forms.
  4. Communicate scientific understanding in oral and written forms.
  5. Appreciate the epistemology of science.
  6. Understand the organization of molecular, cellular, organismal and ecological systems.
  7. Appreciate evolution as a framework for understanding biological systems.
  8. Understand the flow of biological information.
  9. Work with the flow of energy and matter in biological systems.
  10. Understand the interdependence and interactions within biological systems and their emergent properties.

Two themes arise from the five fundamental biological concepts. First, all of biology operates under constraints defined by our understanding of math, physics, and chemistry; it is therefore essential that majors have a strong foundational understanding of both the concepts and the “ways of knowing” in these fields. Second, all of biology operates under the constraints of the mechanisms of evolution; it is therefore essential that majors have a strong foundational understanding of the theories, evidence, and mechanism of evolution.

Research Intensive Senior Experience (RISE)

The Department of Biology encourages its majors to engage deeply in the subject of biology through a capstone project as a senior. Students can opt to conduct a research project through the RISE program that will earn credit toward any of the Biology majors.

Majors work with a faculty mentor to: 1) conduct an independent laboratory, field, or computational research project; 2) build from an internship experience to conduct critical in-depth research of the literature or publicly available data; or 3) teach biology and conduct research in the community in a three-semester program (only available to students in the Biology and Biology of Global Health majors).

Many students begin research before the senior year, some as early as their first year. Students who start their research early can earn up to three credits that apply towards the major (BIOL-300, Research Tutorial) and up to an additional three credits that apply as College elective credits but do not count towards the major (BIOL-304, Elective Research Tutorial). With approval of a faculty advisor within the Department, research also may be conducted in laboratories outside the Department of Biology, including other departments within the College, laboratories at the GU Medical Center, or in the greater DC area, including the National Institutes of Health, the Smithsonian Institution, etc.

Study Abroad

Majors from the Department of Biology can study abroad and transfer credits to the majors. All majors are encouraged to consider building a summer or semester abroad into their undergraduate programs. Although this is not a specific requirement, the perspective gained from the international experience is of value to all of the programs. Students should plan early and discuss their plans with their academic advisor and the Office of International Programs.

Pre-medical studies

Pre-medicine is simply a set of requirements and is not a degree program. Each of the majors offered through the Department of Biology provides students with a strong foundation in science and a significant overlap with the pre-med program requirements. In general, medical schools require a year of college math and a year of biology, general chemistry, and physics, each with laboratory; in addition students must take either a year of organic chemistry or a semester of organic chemistry and a semester of biochemistry. These requirements cannot be fulfilled with AP or IB credits.

Major in Biology

The Biology major provides a comprehensive perspective on all aspects of our biological world, including ecology, evolutionary biology, molecular and cell biology. This major affords students the greatest latitude in choosing courses of their interest across the breadth of biology.  It also permits students to further concentrate their studies in either Ecology, Evolution, and Behavioral Biology (EEB) or Biochemistry, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology (BMCDB).

The Biology major consists of biology, mathematics, general chemistry, and additional sciences. After completing the first-year courses, students enroll in intermediate-level courses. Students must take at least one course from each of two distribution areas and complete them by the end of the third year. Students will also enroll in a Gateway course (BIOL-191) in the spring of their second year.  This course is a communication-intensive course that satisfies the University Integrated Writing requirement.  Upper-level students then choose elective courses from the courses offered by the Department to complete the major.

A concentration within the major (either EEB or BMCDB) requires the completion of six elective courses in the area of concentration. Courses that apply to each area of concentration can be found in a list on the Department’s web site and are noted in the course’s description on Explore. Each concentration should be devised during careful consultation with a faculty advisor and requires declaration to the Dean’s office. The area of the concentration will appear on the student’s transcript.

One-credit option: Students may apply one credit of one non-biology elective course to the major when the course explores the interface between biology and another discipline, for example in ethics or public policy. Courses must be approved in advance by the Director of the Biology major; a list of previously approved courses and an application for approval for new courses can be found on the Department website.

Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) Credit

For students who choose to major in Biology, credit from either the AP Biology Exam, AP Environmental Science Exam, or IB Biology will be counted toward the major.  If a student has taken more than one of these exams, only one will count toward the major.

  • For an AP score of 5, students will receive two credits applied to the total credits required for the major and a 4-credit College elective course. For an AP score of 4, students will receive one credit applied to the total credits required for the major and a 3-credit College elective course. No credit is awarded for an AP score of 3.
  • For the IB program, we accept credits from the Higher Level Biology but not the Standard Level. For a score of 6 or 7, students receive two credits that apply to the major and a 4-credit College elective course. No credit is awarded for an IB score of 5 or below.
  • Regardless of AP or IB score, all majors are required to take BIOL- 103/113 (Foundations in Biology I with laboratory) and BIOL-104/114 (Foundations in Biology II with laboratory).
Courses for the Biology Major

Required Biology Courses (23 credits)

Intermediate-level distribution courses should be completed by the end of the third year.

  • Foundations in Biology I and II (BIOL-103/113 and BIOL-104/114)
  • First-year Seminar in Biology (BIOL-101)
  • Two intermediate-level courses 
  • Biology Gateway course (BIOL-191)

Biology Elective Courses

Twenty-one credits of additional elective courses offered by the Department of Biology will be taken for a total of 44 credits. If a student takes two intermediate-level courses from a distribution area, the second course will count as an elective. To replace traditional coursework, students may take Research Tutorial (BIOL-300) for up to 3 credits and may take RISE (BIOL-341/342) for an additional 6 credits.  Two elective courses must be taken at the advanced level (courses in the BIOL-350-499 range).

Almost all courses with a BIOL-prefix count as Biology electives. Exceptions to this are: courses intended for non-majors (i.e. courses numbered BIOl-001–099); BIOL-203 and BIOL-230, which count as College electives; BIOL-261 and BIOL-262, which contribute just one credit toward the 21-credit requirement; and BIOL-304, which counts as a College elective. 

Additional Required Science Courses for the Biology Major (26 credits)

  • Calculus I (MATH-035) and either Probability and Statistics (MATH-040 or MATH-140) or Calculus II (MATH-036)
  • General Chemistry with laboratory (CHEM-001/-009 and CHEM-002/-010)
  • 8 credits of additional science courses: Organic Chemistry with laboratory (CHEM-115/-117, CHEM-116/-118), Principles of Physics (PHYS-101, 102) or Mechanics (PHYS-151) and Vibrations, Fluids & Waves (PHYS-152), Computer Science I and II (COSC-051, 052) or Advanced Programming (COSC-150) or Introduction to Databases (COSC-280), or Introduction to Environmental Science (STIA-102)

MAJOR IN Biology of Global Health

An underlying motivation for the study of science is the impact that basic discoveries have on human health across the globe. This major examines the biology behind global health concerns today and includes coursework and research spanning the basic laboratory and quantitative sciences, while integrating perspectives from policy, economics, ethics, and culture. Georgetown is especially strong in infectious- and genetic-disease research and is at the forefront of interdisciplinary work in application of policy, law, and ethics to global health issues.

Students interested in this major typically enter the program as Biology majors. Students opting for the Biology of Global Health major will have the opportunity to declare in the fall of second year. At this time, students will be assigned a faculty advisor from within the major.

In spring of the second year, students take BIOL-194, Biology of Global Health.  This Gateway course into the major is a communication-intensive course that satisfies the University-wide Integrated Writing requirement. The other required Biology course for the major is BIOL-401, Senior Seminar, taken in the fall of senior year. Required courses in departments outside of Biology include three semesters of Chemistry, one semester of Calculus, and two semesters of Statistics. In addition, students must take two courses from a diverse course selection that addresses issues at the intersection of global health and ethics, policy, etc.

Students should plan their program in close consultation with their faculty advisor to ensure that they have taken any prerequisites necessary for desired upper level courses. Biology courses successfully completed while studying abroad may count toward the credit requirements for the major in Biology of Global Health when specifically approved by the Department in advance.

Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) Credit

For students who choose to major in Biology of Global Health, credit from either the AP Biology Exam, AP Environmental Science Exam, or IB Biology will be counted toward the major.  If a student has taken more than one of these exams, only one will count toward the major.

  • For an AP score of 5, students will receive two credits applied to the total credits required for the major and a 4-credit College elective course. For an AP score of 4, students will receive one credit applied to the total credits required for the major and a 3-credit College elective course. No credit is awarded for an AP score of 3.
  • For the IB program, we accept credits from the Higher Level Biology but not the Standard Level. For a score of 6 or 7, students receive two credits that apply to the major and a 4-credit College elective course. No credit is awarded for an IB score of 5 or below.
  • Regardless of AP or IB score, all majors are required to take BIOL- 103/113 (Foundations in Biology I with laboratory) and BIOL-104/114 (Foundations in Biology II with laboratory).
Courses for the Biology of Global Health Major

Required Biology Core Courses (16 credits)

  • First-year Seminar in Biology (BIOL-101)
  • Foundations in Biology I and II (BIOL-103/113 and BIOL-104/114)
  • Biology of Global Health (BIOL-194)
  • Senior Seminar (BIOL-401)

Additional Required Science Courses (26 credits)

  • General Chemistry I and II (CHEM-001/009 and CHEM-002/010)
  • Organic Chemistry I (CHEM-115/117)
  • Calculus I (MATH-035)
  • Probability and Statistics (MATH-040) or Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (MATH-140)
  • Biology of Global Health Statistics (BIOL-384) or Applied Statistical Methods (MATH-240) or Ecological Analysis (BIOL-386)

Biology Elective Courses (26 credits)

At least 1 course must be taken in each of the three clusters; students may count Research Tutorial (BIOL-300) for up to 3 credits and may take RISE (BIOL-341 and BIOL-342) for an additional 6 credits towards the total of 26 credits. 

Students should note that course offerings change frequently, most courses are offered in only a single semester each year, and not all courses are offered every year.  Furthermore, courses offered outside of Biology may have limited enrollments for Biology of Global Health majors, and some courses may have prerequisites not listed here or require permission of the instructor. Students should talk with their advisors and also look carefully on the departmental and Registrar's websites to identify course offerings..

Basic Biology Cluster

  • Biochemistry (BIOL-151)
  • Genetics (BIOL-152)
  • Cell Biology (BIOL-170)
  • Developmental Biology (BIOL-170)
  • Seminar: Inquiry into Foundations of Biology (BIOL-203)
  • Dynamic Processes in Biological Physics (BIOL-359)
  • Genome Instability and Human Disease (BIOL-374)
  • Genomics and Bioinformatics (BIOL-379)
  • Molecular Biology (BIOL-390)
  • Structural Biology (BIOL-391)
  • Advanced Development (BIOL-424)
  • Advanced Cell Biology (BIOL-430)

Ecology and Evolution Cluster

  • Ecology (BIOL-180)
  • Evolutionary Processes (BIOL-185)
  • Plants and Society (BIOL-253)
  • Molecular Evolution (BIOL-360)
  • Conservation Biology (BIOL-365)
  • Population Genetics (BIOL-367)
  • Global Climate Change (BIOL-368)
  • Ecological Analysis (BIOL-386), if you fulfilled the applied statistics requirement above with BIOL-384or MATH-240
  • Genetic Conflict (BIOL-387)
  • Modeling Biological Populations (BIOL-422)

Host and Disease Cluster

  • Mammalian Physiology (BIOL-175)
  • Neurobiology (BIOL-195)
  • Immunology (BIOL-358)
  • Microbiology (BIOL-364)
  • Cell Biology of Cancer (BIOL-369)
  • Virology (BIOL-371)
  • Parasitology (BIOL-372)
  • Endocrinology (BIOL-377)
  • Seminar in Infectious Diseases (BIOL-421)

Interdisciplinary Perspectives (minimum of 6 credits)

Students choose two courses in interdisciplinary perspectives from courses offered across campus. Students are cautioned that not all courses are offered every year, courses offered in SNHS and STIA may have limited enrollments for Biology majors, and that some courses have additional prerequisites not explicitly listed here or require permission of the instructor. Courses may be added to these lists as new courses are offered. Students may petition the director of the major to determine whether new courses can fulfill this requirement. Most courses with either INTH or HESY prefixes will fill this requirement. See the Department website for additional information. Examples include:

Major in ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY

The Environmental Biology Major is a “liberal science” major, focused on the science of the biological, chemical, and geological processes that operate on our planet, as well as the ways that humans utilize and alter these processes in cultural, economic, agricultural, and public health systems. This major stresses foundations in biological and quantitative sciences and in scientific communication as a means to understand environmental studies and multifaceted environmental issues.

Students interested in this major typically enter the program as Biology majors; however, transfer and undeclared students are also welcome. Students opting for the Environmental Biology major will join the program, with the approval of the programs’ directors, in the fall of second year, and should enroll in Genetics (BIOL-152) and Ecology (BIOL-180) during this term. In the Spring term, Environmental Biology majors will also enroll in a Gateway course (BIOL-192).  This course is a communication-intensive course that satisfies the University-wide Integrated Writing requirement.

All students in this major take a set of four core courses—Ecology, Evolutionary Processes, Ecological Analysis, and Introduction to Environmental Science—in their second and third years to establish a foundation in biological concepts. Majors also complete six upper-level courses, three from thematic categories and three selected from all upper-level electives that are approved for the major.

Students should plan their program of study in consultation with their faculty advisors. Faculty advisors also help students identify summer or senior research opportunities relevant to environmental biology topics as well as sources of competitive financial support for such activities. Biology courses successfully completed while studying abroad may count toward the credit requirements for the major in Environmental Biology when specifically approved by the Department in advance.

Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) Credit

For students who choose to major in Environmental Biology, credit from either the AP Biology Exam, AP Environmental Science Exam, or IB Biology will be counted toward the major.  If a student has taken more than one of these exams, only one will count toward the major.

  • For an AP score of 5, students will receive two credits applied to the total credits required for the major and a 4-credit College elective course. For an AP score of 4, students will receive one credit applied to the total credits required for the major and a 3-credit College elective course. No credit is awarded for an AP score of 3.
  • For the IB program, we accept credits from the Higher Level Biology but not the Standard Level. For a score of 6 or 7, students receive two credits that apply to the major and a 4-credit College elective course. No credit is awarded for an IB score of 5 or below.
  • Regardless of AP or IB score, all majors are required to take BIOL- 103/113 (Foundations in Biology I with laboratory) and BIOL-104/114 (Foundations in Biology II with laboratory).
Courses for the Environmental Biology Major

Required Biology Courses (30 credits)

  • First-year Seminar in Biology (BIOL-101)
  • Foundations in Biology I and II (BIOL-103/113 and BIOL-104/114)
  • Genetics (BIOL-152)
  • Ecology (BIOL-180)
  • Evolutionary Processes (BIOL-185)
  • Gateway to Environmental Biology (BIOL-192)
  • Ecological Analysis (BIOL-386)
  • Senior Seminar (BIOL-401)

Distribution Courses (6 courses, 19 credits minimum)

Students must take one course from each of Groups A, B and C, and three other courses from Groups A, B or C or Other Upper-level Electives.  

Students should note that course offerings change frequently, most courses are offered in only a single semester each year, and not all courses are offered every year.  Furthermore, courses offered outside of Biology may have limited enrollments for Environmental Biology majors, and some courses may have prerequisites not listed here or require permission of the instructor. Students should talk with their advisors and also look carefully on the departmental and Registrar's websites to identify course offerings..

A. Group A: Ecology and Behavior

  • Animal Behavior (BIOL-226)
  • Plants and Society (BIOL-253)
  • Forest Ecology (BIOL-255)
  • Microbiology (BIOL-364)
  • Conservation Biology (BIOL-365)
  • Marine Biology (BIOL-366)
  • Global Climate Change Ecology (BIOL-368)
  • Plant-Animal Interactions (BIOL-375)

B. Group B: Environmental, Earth and Quantitative Sciences

  • Computer Science I (COSC-051)
  • Environmental Geomorphology (STIA-311)
  • Climate Science and Policy (STIA-412)
  • GIS in Environment and Health (STIA-441)
  • Remote Sensing (STIA 454)

C. Group C: Populations, Genes and Genomes

  • Molecular Evolution (BIOL-360)
  • Population Genetics (BIOL-367)
  • Genomics and Bioinformatics (BIOL-379)

Other Upper-level Electives

  • Research Tutorial (BIOL-300)
  • RISE (BIOL-341, BIOL-342)
  • Dynamic Processes in Biological Physics (BIOL-359)
  • Science and Society: Global Challenges (BIOL-261)
  • Environmental Economics (ECON-275) (NB-requires ECON-001)
  • Environmental Politics (GOVT-354)
  • Politics of Natural Resources (GOVT-331)
  • Health Impacts of the Environment (HSCI-332)
  • Ecology of Global Hunger (INTH-401)
  • Health, Environmental Issues, and Development (INTH-440)
  • Gender and Sustainability (STIA 350)
  • Journalism in Science, Environment & Health (STIA-352)
  • Environmental Security (STIA-374)
  • Energy & Environment in China (STIA-379)
  • Natural Resources and Security (STIA-418)
  • Energy & Environment in Eurasia (STIA-419)
  • Environmental Sustainability and Business Strategy (STIA-497)

Additional Required Science Courses (21 credits)

  • General Chemistry I and II (CHEM-001/009 and CHEM-002/010)
  • Calculus I (MATH-035)
  • Probability and Statistics (MATH-040) or Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (MATH-140) or Applied Statistical Methods (MATH-240)
  • Environmental Geoscience (STIA-227/228)

MAJOR IN Neurobiology

Given our rapidly evolving understanding of brain as mind, study of the nervous system is considered one of the great frontiers in science today. Within the broader area of Neuroscience, Neurobiology focuses on the molecules, cells, and circuits that promote brain function. The Neurobiology major at Georgetown is designed to educate students in the foundations of biology and neurobiology while providing opportunities for advanced study on a range of disciplines, from cell, molecular and developmental neuroscience to cognitive science and psychology as well as the intersections of these disciplines.

Students interested in the Neurobiology major typically enter the program as Biology majors. After consultation with the program’s directors, students join the major  in the fall of the second year. In spring of the second year, students take Neurobiology (BIOL-195). This course is a communication-intensive course that satisfies the University-wide Integrated Writing requirement., In subsequent years, a series of four additional required courses as well as electives to develop depth in neurobiology.

Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) Credit

For students who choose to major in Neurobiology, credit from either the AP Biology Exam or IB Biology will be counted toward the major.  If a student has taken more than one of these exams, only one will count toward the major.  The AP Environmental Biology Exam will not count toward the Neurobiology major.

  • For an AP score of 5, students will receive two credits applied to the total credits required for the major and a 4-credit College elective course. For an AP score of 4, students will receive one credit applied to the total credits required for the major and a 3-credit College elective course. No credit is awarded for an AP score of 3.
  • For the IB program, we accept credits from the Higher Level Biology but not the Standard Level. For a score of 6 or 7, students receive two credits that apply to the major and a 4-credit College elective course. No credit is awarded for an IB score of 5 or below.
  • Regardless of AP or IB score, all majors are required to take BIOL- 103/113 (Foundations in Biology I with laboratory) and BIOL-104/114 (Foundations in Biology II with laboratory).
Courses for the Neurobiology Major

Required Biology Courses (28 credits)

  • First-year Seminar in Biology (BIOL-101)
  • Foundations in Biology I and II (BIOL-103 and 104) with Laboratory (BIOL-113 and 114)
  • Neurobiology (BIOL-195)
  • Synaptic Transmission (BIOL-354)
  • Neurodisorders (BIOL-370)
  • Developmental Neurobiology (BIOL-376)
  • Sensory Systems (BIOL-380)
  • Senior Seminar (BIOL-401)

Elective Courses for the Neurobiology Major (21 credits)

Students may choose up to two courses from Group B to count towards the 21 elective credits.

Students should note that course offerings change frequently, most courses are offered in only a single semester each year, and not all courses are offered every year.  Furthermore, courses offered outside of Biology may have limited enrollments for Neurobiology majors, and some courses may have prerequisites not listed here or require permission of the instructor. Students should talk with their advisors and also look carefully on the departmental and Registrar's websites to identify course offerings.

Group A

  • Biological Chemistry (BIOL-151)
  • Genetics (BIOL-152)
  • Developmental Cell (BIOL-170)
  • Research Tutorial (BIOL-300) Research (laboratory, literature, or internship) must be in an area of neuroscience and be approved by major directors.
  • RISE (BIOL-341 and BIOL-342) Research (laboratory, literature, or internship, but not RISE-and-Teach) must be in an area of neuroscience and must be approved by major directors.
  • Developmental Cell Biology (BIOL-170)
  • Mammalian Physiology (BIOL-175)
  • Cell Biology (BIOL-363)
  • Endocrinology (BIOL-377)
  • Genomics and Bioinformatics (BIOL-379)
  • Molecular Biology (BIOL-390)
  • Advanced Molecular Biology (BIOL-480)
  • Functional Neuroimaging and Cognition (NSCI-525)
  • Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration (NSCI-556)

Group B

  • General Psychology (PSYC-001)
  • Research Methods and Statistics (PSYC-002)
  • Physiological Psychology (PSYC-120)
  • Cognition (PSYC-130)
  • Monkeys Apes and Humans (PSYC-223)
  • Animal Behavior (BIOL-226)
  • Psychology of Memory (PSYC-231)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience (PSYC-234)
  • Social and Affective Neurosciences (PSYC-235)
  • Psychology of Aging (PSYC-263)
  • Cognitive Neurogenetics (PSYC-350)

Additional Science and Math Courses (18 credits)

  • General Chemistry I and II with laboratory (CHEM-001/-009 and 002/-010)
  • Calculus I (MATH-035)
  • Calculus II (MATH-036) or Probability and Statistics (MATH-040) or Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (MATH-140)

MINOR IN BIOLOGY

A minor in Biology requires a minimum of five Biology courses and nineteen credits, excluding BIOL-101. Biology courses designed for non-majors cannot be included. Foundations in Biology I and II are required. The one-credit option course credits may not be applied to the credit requirements for the minor. BIOL-300 (Research Tutorial) may be counted towards the minor, but BIOL-341 and BIOL-342 (RISE) may not be counted towards the minor.


Contact Information

Please contact the Director of Undergraduate Students and Studies in Biology (Professor Heidi Elmendorf, hge@georgetown.edu) with general questions and questions about the majors. For questions on the Biology of Global Health major, please contact Professor Anne Rosenwald (rosenwaa@georgetown.edu). For questions on the Environmental Biology major, please contact Professor Martha Weiss (weissm@georgetown.edu). For questions on the Neurobiology major, please contact Professor Joseph Neale (nealej@georgetown.edu).

(For course listings for Biology see http://courses.georgetown.edu)