Certificates

School of Foreign Service

Certificate Programs mark secondary levels of concentration within the bachelor’s degree. They are strictly optional and are awarded only in conjunction with the undergraduate degree.  Certificate programs should be viewed as a means for focusing interests and structuring elective course work.  Interested students should discuss the certificate and its role within the general bachelor’s program with his or her advising dean.  

Students studying at the Georgetown University in Qatar campus in Doha, Qatar, can refer to the Georgetown University in Qatar Bulletin section for Certificate options.

Certificate in African Studies*
Certificate in Arab Studies*
Certificate in Asian Studies*
Certificate in Australian, New Zealand and Pacific Studies 
Certificate in Diplomatic Studies
Certificate in Eurasian, Russian, and East European Studies*
Certificate in European Studies*
Certificate in International Business Diplomacy
Certificate in Islam and Muslim-Christian Relations*
Certificate in Journalism and Digital Media
Certificate in Religion, Ethics, and World Affairs

Only certificates marked with an (*) are open to Georgetown College students.

Certificate in African Studies 

The African Studies Certificate requires a total of 6 courses (18 credit hours) and proficiency in one of the following foreign languages: Arabic, French, Portuguese, Spanish, or Swahili. Students may also fulfill the language requirement by completing at least beginner’s level in any language and one year of study of an indigenous African language. Study abroad in Africa is strongly encouraged, but not required. There is an optional senior thesis.

The Program offers competitive fellowships that support participation in the African Studies Spring Break in Kenya program as well as summer study abroad programs.

Requirements
  • HIST-111 or HIST-112: History of Africa I or II
  • ANTH-240: African Cultural Modernities
  • INAF-357: African Politics and Government
  • INAF-348: African Studies Capstone Course or Senior Thesis Seminar
  • Two approved electives (see African Studies website for list and details)
  •  Language Proficiency, see above

Certificate in Arab Studies 

REQUIREMENTS

The certificate in Arab Studies requires:

  • Four semesters of Arabic or successful passage of proficiency exam
  • Six courses (18 credits)
    • ARST-401: Understanding the Arab World 
    • HIST-161:Middle East II
    • 4 elective courses (at least one of which must have an ARST prefix)
      • Politics
      • Culture & Society
      • 2 free electives (if Arabic course, must be a 300 or 400-level content course)
    • Research paper/capstone (1 credit) – taken during final semester; 25-30 page research paper

Fore more information visit the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies website. 

Certificate in Asian Studies 

REQUIREMENTS

The certificate in Asian Studies requires 6 courses (18 credits), a senior Thesis, plus language study or equivalent. Candidates for the certificate should achieve a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in the six courses. Coursework should reflect a diverse study of Asia.

Language Candidates for the Asian Studies Certificate must demonstrate facility in a language indigenous to Asia in one of the following ways:

  • Complete two years (four semesters) of university language coursework with an average of B or better; or
  • Pass the Faculty of Languages and Linguistics placement examination at the level of second year or above; or
  • Pass the School of Foreign Service Oral Proficiency Exam with a grade of “fair” or above.

Coursework 6 courses are required:

  • 3 courses from at least three different disciplines (government, history, sociology, anthropology, economics, political economy, theology, humanities, culture)
  • One required seminar capstone course: GOVT-374/INAF-347 Senior Seminar on Asia.
  • 2 electives (in any discipline except acquisition-level language)

Thesis Candidates must complete a thesis requirement:

  • Candidates are required to take the Senior Seminar on Asia (GOVT-374/INAF-347) during the fall semester of their senior year. Candidates will prepare their thesis in this course.
  • Candidates must receive a B+ or better on their thesis to earn the certificate.

For more information, see the Asian Studies website.

Certificate in Australian, New Zealand and Pacific Studies

Candidates for the Certificate in Australian, New Zealand and Pacific Studies must satisfactorialy complete six (6) one-semester courses devoted substantially to the study of Australia and New Zealand.

Requirements
  • INAF-309 Australia/New Zealand Tutorial
  • 5 courses from at least 3 different disciplines including history, government, economics, sociology/anthropology, demography, public policy, international affairs, literature, fine art and film arts

For more information and a list of approvecd courses in the certificate program, see the Center for Australian, New Zealand & Pacific Studies website.

Certificate in Diplomatic Studies

The undergraduate Certificate in Diplomatic Studies is designed for students whose careers will demand an understanding of the formulation and implementation of foreign policy. It is open to students from all BSFS majors and seeks to build on the BSFS program’s multidisciplinary core curriculum that includes courses on international affairs, government, economics, history, theology, philosophy, geography, and foreign languages. Diplomacy is the conduct or practice of foreign policy – its formulation and implementation – by government and inter-governmental organizations in furtherance of their interests.  Diplomacy is neither synonymous with foreign policy itself or international relations, nor is it solely the practice of international negotiation or the tradecraft of professional diplomats (e.g. how to deliver a demarche).  The certificate is therefore designed to complement the IPOL foreign policy/processes field and to increase the understanding of students from other majors of the practical side of policy creation and execution. 

Requirements
  • One course in Elements of Statecraft, e.g. development, negotiation, public diplomacy, economic diplomacy (choose one from list below or approved course)
    • GOVT-260 International Security
    • INAF-363 Practicing Diplomacy Abroad
    • INAF-380 Negotiations, Mediation & Political Persuasion
    • IPOL-360 Introduction to Strategic Thought
    • JUPS-271 Conflict Transformation
  • One course in Diplomatic History and Contemporary Foreign Policy (choose one from list below or approved course)
    • GOVT-264 Contemporary US Foreing Policy
    • GOVT-276 Human Rights in International Relations
    • GOVT-636 Peacekeeping
    • GOVT-443 Russian Foreign Policy
    • HIST-282 The US in the World to 1945
    • INAF-109 Theorteical Aspects of ME Morras
    • INAF-207 Global Challenges in a Changing World
    • INAF-360 Smaller States & Peacemaking
    • INAF-431 South Asia - Issues of War/Peace
    • INAF-440 US Approach to ME & Arab-Israeli Peace
    • INAF-499 China's Evolving Role in Africa
    • IPOL-345 National Security Law: Policy and Practice
    • JPUS-342 Justice After War
  • Four upper-level courses from the approved ISD course list

Candidates must also complete an internship with organizations or institutions whose work directly affects or is directly affected by diplomacy. ISD will consider waivers and exceptions due to extenuating circumstances, but these will be the exception. Candidates are required to submit to ISD a significant research project – directed, individual research on a topic of the student’s choice, with analysis and policy recommendations of at least 20-25 pages in length - dealing with a subject/issue/event of diplomatic significance. This paper will preferably relate back to the student’s internship experience.  There are a number of channels by which a student may undertake this research and the paper for certificate credit:

  • Any course above the basic survey level taught by a member of the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy.
  • As an ISD student fellow under one of the several research fellowships administered by the Institute.
  • A research paper conducted as part of another course within the intent of this certificate (paper topic would require prior ISD approval), including a Diplomacy Lab project.
  • A paper produced in a research tutorial, including the newly-approved 3 credit internship course.
  • A paper researched and submitted directly to ISD and independent of the above. The paper would not be for course credit but would be for certificate credit.

Students who wish to apply for the Certificate in Diplomatic Studies should visit the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy website for information and application details.

CERTIFICATE in EURASIAN, RUSSIAN, AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES 

REQUIREMENTS

The certificate in Eurasian, Russian, and East European Studies requires seven courses, distributed by the outline below, plus language study or equivalent.

  • LANGUAGE: 4 semesters (minimum) Intensive Russian, Polish, Ukrainian, Persian or Turkish Language; or native speaker of these or another language of the region
  • 1 course in ECONOMICS
  • 1 course in POLITICS
  • 2 courses in HISTORY
  • 1 course in INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
  • 1 course in SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY/CULTURE
  • SENIOR COLLOQUIUM in Russian and East European Studies (REES-398), which includes preparation of a substantial research project

For more information, see the Center for Eurasian, Russian, and East European (CERES) website.

CERTIFICATE in European Studies 

REQUIREMENTS

7 courses plus language study or equivalent

  • Coursework in a major European language (other than English) through the advanced level
  • 2 upper-level European History courses
  • 1 Economics course
  • 1 Government course
  • 1 ideological/cultural elective
  • 1 regional/international elective
  • 1 European Studies Research colloquium

Admission to the certificate program is based on an application which reflects a directed, purposeful selection of courses. The application must be turned in by the end of the sophomore year or during the junior year with permission. No applications will be accepted from students with senior standing.

Students must earn a grade of “B” or better in the Senior Colloquium.

For more information and a list of approved courses in the certificate program, see the BMW Center for German and European Studies website.

CERTIFICATE IN ISLAM AND MUSLIM-CHRISTIAN RELATIONS

We live in a globally interdependent world in which Islam and Muslim-Christian relations are becoming more and more important and prominent. More than half the world's population is Muslim or Christian. The two religious communities share religious roots and share issues of faith in the modern world, religious pluralism, and tolerance. Relations between Muslims and Christians are an important part of contemporary global affairs and world history and professionals in every field of work can benefit from a better understanding of Muslim-Christian relations.

To assist students interested in focusing a part of their undergraduate education on this significant subject, the Prince Alwaleed Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding offers a Certificate in Islam and Muslim-Christian Understanding. The goal of the certificate program is to provide a way in which students can receive guidance in the study of Islam and Muslim-Christian relations through a defined but flexible academic program. The broader goal for the Center is to promote peaceful and productive Muslim-Christian relations through educating students who will be international leaders of the future.

REQUIREMENTS

The certificate program is similar to many at Georgetown University in its general structure. To obtain the certificate, students must complete a total of 6 classes (18 or more credit hours) to include: two semesters of basic foundational courses, at least three elective courses related to the subject, and a final capstone course.

Each participant is expected to develop a program of study in consultation with the director of the program and the Assistant Director in the Prince Alwaleed Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding. Students in the program are encouraged to utilize the variety of resources available, including overseas study. There is no formal language requirement, but students are encouraged to study languages that are appropriate to their particular interests in Islamic studies.

Foundational Courses The Program assumes that undergraduates will be taking or will have completed the basic core program for their degree. As a result, they will already have had a solid introduction to Christian and Western traditions. The certificate foundation course requirement is to provide a similar introduction to Islam. Students in the program are required to take two courses that provide a basic foundation for the study of Islam and Muslim-Christian relations. These courses will normally be from the following list (note: the two courses do not have to be in a sequence):

  • HIST-109 The Islamic World
  • HIST-160 and 161 Middle East Civilization I & II
  • ARAB-201 Intro to Islamic Civilization
  • THEO-042 Exploring the Qur'an
  • THEO-050 Intro to Islam

Elective Courses Students are required to take at least three (3) elective courses, to be approved by the director of the certificate program. These courses should have some common theme or focus of interest.  There is no list of elective courses that have been formally approved for the Certificate Program. Any relevant course may, subject to the approval of the program director, be used to satisfy this requirement. Normally at least two of these courses will be numbered 300 or above.

The Capstone Course As a final part of the certificate program, students are required to undertake study at an advanced level that involves a research project dealing with the subject of Islam and Muslim-Christian relations. A capstone course can be any course above the basic survey level that is taught by members of the faculty of the Prince Alwaleed Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding. It is the responsibility of the student to notify the professor at the beginning of the semester that the student plans to use that course to fulfill the capstone requirement. The professor will then provide the student with the guidelines and expectations for the research paper to fulfill the capstone requirement. The student also needs to notify the director of the program regarding the Capstone Course.

In special cases, students may petition to present a major paper dealing with a topic in the area of Islam and Muslim-Christian relations rather than taking a specific course. The paper topic must be approved by the certificate program director, and the resulting paper should represent significant research and analysis (at least 20-25 pages in length). The paper may, under special circumstances, be a revised version of work that has been presented as a part of work for a course or project, subject to the approval of the program director. The paper must be read and approved by at least two members of the faculty of the Prince Alwaleed Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding to be named by the program director.

For more information about application to to the program, visit the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding website.

Certificate in International Business Diplomacy

Requirements
  • One course in INAF-502, 504, 507, 508, or 523
  • ACCT-390 Business Accounting & Finance 
  • Four Electives as approved by the program coordinator

For more information on this certificate please visit the Landegger Program in International Business Diplomacy website.

CERTIFICATE IN JOURNALISM AND DIGITAL MEDIA

Students pursuing the Certificate are required to complete a total of 18 academic credits, which include: one 3-credit foundational course; one 3-credit theory and practice course; three 3-credit elective courses; and, one 3-credit capstone course.

Students may choose elective courses from among the courses that CCT has already approved for the Certificate Program, or, can petition in advance of registration for other courses to count as electives.

The curriculum for the Certificate Program is designed so that students may pursue the core and elective courses in any sequence. Below are details of these requirements and eligible courses:

Requirements

  • One 3-credit foundational course
    • CCTP-635: Critical Studies in Journalism
  • One 3-credit theory/practice course
    • CCTP-710: Journalistic Content Production
  • Three 3-credit elective courses (* CCT Research Methods course):
    • CCTP-585: Journalism & the Politics of Terror
    • CCTP-691: Break & (Re)Build Trust in the News
    • CCTP-614: International News & Mass Media
    • CCTP-600: Political Campaigns & Communications Strategies
    • CCTP-767: New Media & Politics
    • CCTP-757: Media & American Elections
    • CCTP-643: Political Socialization
    • CCTP-616: Crisis Communications
    • CCTP-655: Media Production Lab
    • CCTP-654: Narrative Networks
    • CCTP-808: Qualitative Methods for Communications Research*
    • CCTP-637: Social Media: Cltr Ideology of Middle East*
    • CCTP-607: Big Ideas: AI to the Cloud*
    • CCTP-642: Content Analysis*
    • CCTP-685: Survey Research Methods*
    • CCTP-696: Social Network Analysis*
    • CCTP-606: Archival Methods: Rights to Information*
  • One 3-credit capstone course:
    • CCTP-533: CCT Internship
    • CCTP 584: Documentary Video Production
    • CCTP 850: Digital Presence & Strategic Persuasion

Certificate in Religion, ethics, and World Affairs

Requirements

Students must take a total of 6 courses for the certifiate from the following:

  • 1 Course in Area 1:  Faith and Ethics in International Relations
  • 1 Course in Area 2:  Religion and Politics in Comparative Perspective
  • 1 Course in Area 3: Religion in History and Culture
  • Capstone GOVT-313 or INAF-438
  • 2 Electives from any of the above areas

For more information about how to apply for the certificate and approved courses, please visit the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs website.